Placements

Long Term (Permanent) Placements

When

a child or young person cannot return home, decisions have to be made to find a permanent family for the child. These placements will usually last until the young person leaves care at 18 years of age.

Long term placements include:

  • Matching
  • Risk assessment
  • Regular Social Worker contact and input to support and sustain the placement
  • Provision of Looked After Review reports
  • Support for contact, participation and social activities
  • Support to sustain the placement by a multi-disciplinary team of professionals including therapist led specialist where appropriate.
  • Identification of appropriate education provision, ongoing support and educational outcomes monitoring.

Short Term (Temporary) Placements:

Short term foster carers provide a temporary place to stay until the child can return home to their own family, move into a longer-term fostering placement or an adoptive family is found, assessment or remand. This is not intended to provide a long term placement for the

child or young person.  A short term placement can last for a few weeks.

  • Matching
  • Risk assessment
  • Regular Social Worker contact
  • Provision of Looked After Review reports
  • Support for contact, participation and social activities
  • Therapist led specialist (if appropriate) which take place to share ideas and solutions around challenging behaviours the child or young person may display. These sessions will lead to a report
  • Identification of appropriate education provision, ongoing support and educational outcomes monitoring.

Therapeutic Placements

These placements are for children and young people who need intensive input not only from the carers but from other professionals. The idea of these placement is to help the young person develop pro-social learning skills to help them change/modify there behaviours which are causing them to get into trouble or bringing them to the attention of other agencies etc. The children may have a range of complex and challenging needs and have experienced numerous placement disruptions or significant stays in residential or secure care.  These placements will last until the young person’s behaviours are modified or the placement changes into a permanent placement.

  • Caldecott Fostering Service Social Workers support and working closely with the foster carer on a day-to-day basis, ensuring safety and stability within the placement.
  • Caldecott Fostering Service believes that education is essential to lifelong wellbeing and to this end we liaise closely with the schools that the young people attend as well as supporting the young person whilst attending school. Helping the young person focus and encouraging the child to achieve and enjoy their education.
  • Caldecott Fostering Service Therapists play a vital role in creating a shared understanding of the child’s emotional needs. This offers a real opportunity for positive and sustained attachments to be formed.( if appropriate and agreed by the placing authority)
  • Our social workers work closely with the child/young persons social worker to ensure that each child has the best chance of achieving the desired outcomes according to their care plan.

Respite Placements

Respite involves children living with their own family or foster carers, but having short stays with another foster family to give their family/main carers a break. At Caldecott Fostering Service, this usually involves looking after a child or young person who is placed with our foster carers for a weekend or one to two weeks.

  • Matching
  • Risk assessment
  • Regular Social Worker contact
  • Support for contact, participation and social activities

Parent and Child Placements

This type of placement is provided to a mother and/or father and their children where foster carers can provide support and guidance to the parent(s) and help them develop parenting skills.

  • Matching
  • Risk assessment
  • Regular Social Worker contact

The Foster Carer

  • Foster carers do not necessarily provide parental care (except if required) but helps and encourages the parent to develop their skills.
  • Foster carer has an important role observing and recording how the parent looks after the child.

Parent and child or more likely, mother and baby fostering can be complex and challenging and the foster carer requires skills and qualities such as:

  • Assertiveness
  • Discretion
  • Confidence
  • Sensitivity
  • 24-hour commitment

This kind of fostering placement is often an alternative to a mother and baby unit and usually results from a court referral, but not always. A baby’s social worker may make the decision for a parent and child fostering placement, if the parent is not coping well and needs extra help but does not have an extended family they can live with. The parent might not necessarily be a young person.


Supervised contact

The Fostering Service is able to provide a supervised contact service at Caldecott House, or off site if agreed with the local authority. The aim of this service is to make supervised contact less stressful particularly for the children and young people and to ensure that parents are made to feel welcome.